Mogul has been the sim for me since 2007. Okay - I gave up on it the first time I played it and it showed David Ortiz hating Boston, but once I came on the boards, learned the game, I was back in. It wasn't my only baseball game - MLB Power Pros on Wii gave me years of fun, and later the Super Mega series came a knockin...but for simulation, it's been Mogul. Just playing and logging, then joining leagues (and getting hosed in pushy trades my first day, then finding cheating a-holes, and finally settling on some nice compatriots), then running leagues. Between one or two leagues, the arcade-style baseball games, and 4 or 5 fantasy leagues a year, I was full on baseball.

I had gotten some OOTP versions over the years - gifts, free, HumbleBundles, maybe I bought one, I forget. I had invested a little bit of time in version 15, playing as a lowly manager of a Dominican summer league, I think for the Phillies...and I found a way to lose every game. I'm not talking like, .333 winning percentage...I played through 40 games and won only 1. I had specifically limited my scope to only managing my team, unable to make any transactions or have to care about the league as a whole. It was like getting into progressive music at first: I made it the smallest possible bite, so my big dumb brain could acclimate and not freak out. And I did terribly.

Fast forward a few years and some buddies have an OOTP league. They had a GM opening and it was a no-good rebuilding squad...really hard to screw it up, no pressure. Just good trades, and I've learned that from years of Moguling. It was using the new version, but I have the money...so I took the plunge and bought it. OOTP 21, installed...my first time as a GM.

Holy cow. This is like work. Big and overwhelming work.

First off the entire minors rosters are there. Not just R/A/AA/AAA, but DSL/AZL variants of rookie league. A-, A, and A+ levels of A-ball. IL and waiver/DFA sections entirely separate. 40 man roster. And the number of players! My god.

The first thing is adapting to the "realistic" scouting scores. I hate it. Everyone is at least a 20 at birth. And the highest at anything is 80, but no one is that, so it's just a sea of guys rated 20 to 45. Some people give me the scoop - "you have to look at their traits," I'm told. Some 3B may not be much but he has a great arm...try making him a two-way player. This guy looks like he'll crap out at 21 - but wait, he's got a great work ethic, he may turn into a late bloomer at 26.

Mogul has scouting - you pay your scouting budget, you see your collective scouts' opinion. OOTP has your head scout's idea stamped on everything, but then you get a rating - that scouting is accurate, or VERY accurate, or not-at-all accurate. Then there's a standard leaguewide OSA scouting that we all see. You have to toggle between them both - your scout may thing your 3B will become a star, but toggle to OSA and the whole league sees him as a backup at best. THEN there's BNN ratings of prospects, which aren't necessarily in line with either. Complexity upon complexity.

The amount of data is deep and rich. Every sheet of players you pull up lets you flip between ratings, potential, financial info etc- AND add columns or filters as you see fit. Want to keep track of all your top stars, or the two-way guys? No problem, make a shortlist.

The biggest things I don't like are:
- that flat scouting score. 20 to 50 (for 95% of players), with increments at 5, just gives so little range. Mogul having a 77 versus an 81 means more to me - it allows little things to get in that weighting that are missing.
- not color coding guys. Guys that are Rule V draftees, or headed to FA, or MLB vs minors contracts. Or first-year draftees. You spend all this time finding a suitable prospect to accept for trade, only to find out he's a Rule V guy or just drafted that year. You didn't check his 7th page! Your fault!
- There's already so much deep information here...why is OOTP storing a player's weight gain? Plus or minus a pound every week??



Name:  ootp.jpg
Views: 63
Size:  50.2 KB