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Thread: The Orange and Black(Sox)

  1. #1186
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    hotchickenstew: Thanks! And that's assuming they manage to hold off the Giants, of course.

    September, 1940

    Six more games. The Giants face the Reds and Cubs. Fourth place and seventh, both under .500, with the Cubs at 96 having a good chance to lose 100 games. But the Phillies face the same Reds, and the Pirates - the only team in baseball worse than the Cubs this year.

    We'll travel to Philadelphia to see the Athletics, preparatory to our likely trip the following week for the Phillies. Then we host the Red Sox in three wonderfully meaningless games. Life at work continues to be good.

    * * *

    September 27 - 29, 1940
    Baltimore Orioles (93 - 55) at Philadelphia Athletics (56 - 92)


    Connie, always a gentleman, has a banner over the entrance to Shibe Park saying "Welcome 1940 Champions." He's so much the better sport than I am.

    September 27: Our three run ninth was better than their one run ninth. Certainly our three home runs, Easter's 33rd, Rizzuto's sixth, and Johnny Ostrowski's first in the majors, were better. Orioles 9, Athletics 7

    Before the game, Connie re-signed Harry Rice. Rice had been on the Athletics in their - what do I call it? - glory year? He actually began his career when Kimball freed the rookies back in 1921, and signed with the Boston Braves the next day. After two years there, he spent 1924 in Philadelphia, but the Baker Bowl, not Shibe Park, until a mid season trade sent him across town to the Athletics. There he remained until earlier this year, batting .322 over all that time, driving in runs, scoring runs, each over 1,000. He batted .313, drove in 70 and scored 98 in 1931, the year Connie's Athletics surprised the world by winning the World Series over the Giants. But this year, he'd gone back to Boston, until they released him. Now, Connie has brought the 38 year old back, expecting him to retire as a member of the organization that he was a part of for so long.

    I love that kind of baseball story. Don't you?

    I'm also rather partial to the two titans of the other league continuing to win, even as their season runs out. Both did today. Three apart, with five to play.

    September 28: A nice, simple game. Glenn Gardner wins number 19, nice and easy. Orioles 4, Athletics 1

    Three apart, four to play, as both teams continue to win. For the Phils, this is number 106. You'll notice that our number isn't nearly that high.

    September 29: Jack Kramer did a fine job, but Al Epperly gave up one in the bottom of the ninth to end our winning streak at seven. Athletics 3, Orioles 2 Neither team in the NL won today - they both had the day off, prior to their final three games.

    * * *

    The Baltimore SUn, on September 29, published a little story that I think might interest you. It certainly did me - and our lawyers.

    The three and a half column story appeared under the headline "OUR APOLOGIES TO LOU GEHRIG AND THE ORIOLES." In his apology‚ Sun reporter Jesse Linthicum admitted he had no business getting "snarled up in medical controversy." No kidding! He further stated that "Gehrig has no communicable disease and was not suffering from the mysterious polio germ that supposedly played havoc with the Orioles ball club."

    Yes, so much havoc that we are going to the World Series next week. Give me plenty more of that kind of havoc, please!

    "Lou is a personal hero‚" Linthicum added. "Hurting his feelings was far from my mind.' And I'm sure that being sued was pretty far from his mind, too. But I doubt it was far from the minds of the editors and publishers of the Sun.

    * * *

    We're going to drop the suit. We had a board meeting about it and everything.

    But we're going to wait until after the World Series to tell anyone. Let 'em sweat for a bit.

    * * *

    September 30 - October 2, 1940
    Boston Red Sox (86 - 65) at Baltimore Orioles (95 - 56)


    September 30: A sellout crowd. I love a sellout crowd.

    I'm rather fond of Bill Dietrich winning his 18th game of the season, too. "The time in the bullpen did him some good, Charlie," McCarthy tells me. "The time in the bullpen made him hate you, Joe," I reply. "Right. Exactly my plan."

    Wonder if he's ever used it on me? Some days, it works well.

    Anyway, not much action on either side, just enough on ours to make it work. Orioles 2, Red Sox 1

    And in the other league, both teams won, again. But time has run out for the Giants, even with their 104 wins and counting.

    The Philadelphia Phillies are 1940 National League Champions!

    From the first day of the season, to the last, the Phillies were on top. Sports writers are talking about how this is their chance to prove that they're the best organization around, surpassing the squads we had from the mid '20s to the mid '30s. Claiming the mantle from us, so to speak. Others say that we're back on top of our league now, and a Philadelphia/Baltimore Series is just the first of many such to come.

    Personally, as I said about us being a fluke this year, I think the latter folks are indulging in the marihuana a bit, illegal or not.

    October 1: I really hate Larry French on the Red Sox. I think this is the third time he's beaten us since being traded. But then, it was Roy Partlow, so what did I expect? Not the two home runs I got from Snuffy Stirnweiss, I'll tell you. Red Sox 10, Orioles 5

    October 2: Glenn Gardner got bumped up a day in the rotation, both to allow plenty of rest for everyone else, to allow Veach to take the mound in game one, and to get a final chance at win number 20. I considered asking McCarthy not to do it, so that I could go to arbitration against a 19 game winner as opposed to a 20 game winner. But in the end, I didn't do it.

    And in the end, he did. They got 10 hits to our six, but we made the most of them. Orioles 5, Red Sox 2 Easter didn't get an RBI, and Foxx didn't play except to pinch hit, so they'll remain tied atop the leader board in that category for the year. Gardner got his 20th. I suspect that will help him get a nice salary from someone next year. I wouldn't be surprised to see it in New York. Just hope it's the Giants and not the Yankees.

    We've got three days off before we start against the Phillies here at home. The Publicity Hounds, Scott Wyatt, Jim Bandy, and Adams Gordon, have been working themselves to...

    I started to say "working themselves to death," didn't I? Ah, Jeff, I wish you were here.
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  2. #1187
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    October, 1940

    Final 1940 statistics

    Code:
    1940 Batting             Team    G   AVG    AB    H  2B  3B  HR   BB    K   SB  CS    R  RBI   SLG   OBP
    Rizzuto, Phil             BAL  151  .278   650  181  30  13   6   40   43    5   5   95   59  .392  .321
    Agan, Keith               BAL  131  .316   519  164  24   7   7   38   57    1   1   66   68  .430  .364
    Elliott, Bob              BAL  124  .301   511  154  31  13  12   49   51    1   0   94   76  .483  .360
    Easter, Luke              BAL  124  .275   495  136  14   6  33   48   67    0   0   80  108  .527  .341
    Williams, Ted             BAL  127  .313   486  152  28   5  26   62   55    2   2   92  100  .551  .387
    Spence, Stan              BAL  122  .269   427  115  16   3  16   47   31    0   1   60   65  .433  .340
    Stirnweiss, Snuffy        BAL   91  .265   412  109  17  12   5   27   44    2   1   73   36  .400  .311
    Marion, Red               BAL   99  .276   355   98  20   2   7   34   72    2   1   50   42  .403  .341
    McCoy, Benny              BAL   71  .225   227   51   9   2   4   35   23    0   0   21   31  .335  .326
    Sloan, Bruce              BAL   63  .218   202   44   7   1   6   31   24    1   1   27   31  .351  .321
    Patrick, Bob              BAL   65  .276   145   40   9   1   3   17   31    1   1   19   22  .414  .350
    Sheehan, Jim              BAL   51  .294   143   42   3   0   4   11   17    0   0   19   26  .399  .342
    Epps, Hal                 BAL   49  .268   138   37   3   8   0   18   22    0   0   17   17  .406  .352
    Otero, Reggie             BAL   64  .280   132   37   8   1   1   10   20    0   0   25   18  .379  .331
    Maier, Bob                BAL   40  .301   123   37  10   0   3    8   15    0   1   22   12  .455  .344
    Veach, Al                 BAL   33  .162   111   18   3   0   0    3   25    0   0    9    8  .189  .183
    Dietrich, Bill            BAL   32  .110   100   11   1   0   0    2   37    0   0    2    3  .120  .126
    Gardner, Glenn            BAL   30  .146    89   13   4   0   0    3   17    0   0    7    5  .191  .172
    Partlow, Roy              BAL   30  .197    71   14   2   0   0    3   16    0   0    5    4  .225  .230
    Kramer, Jack              BAL   20  .204    54   11   0   0   0    0   15    0   0    3    2  .204  .204
    Maitland, Luke            BAL   12  .257    35    9   2   0   2    4    7    0   0    5    4  .486  .333
    Robinson, Jackie          BAL   14  .120    25    3   1   0   0    2    3    0   0    1    2  .160  .185
    Graham, Jack              BAL   28  .136    22    3   1   0   1    2    0    0   0    2    3  .318  .208
    Reese, Pee Wee            BAL   16  .250    20    5   1   0   0    0    2    1   0    2    2  .300  .250
    Piechota, Al              BAL    8  .150    20    3   1   0   0    0    5    0   0    0    1  .200  .150
    Ostrowski, Johnny         BAL    8  .111     9    1   0   0   1    1    2    0   0    2    1  .444  .200
    Woodend, George           BAL   12  .000     5    0   0   0   0    0    3    0   0    0    0  .000  .000
    Zabala, Adrian            BAL    6  .250     4    1   0   0   0    0    1    0   0    0    1  .250  .200
    Crowson, Woody            BAL   29  .000     3    0   0   0   0    0    0    0   0    0    0  .000  .000
    Epperly, Al               BAL   26  .000     2    0   0   0   0    0    1    0   0    0    0  .000  .000
    Brown, Walter             BAL    3  .500     2    1   0   0   0    0    0    0   0    1    0  .500  .500
    Fox, Pete                 BAL    3 1.000     1    1   0   0   0    0    0    0   0    0    0 1.000 1.000
    Palagyi, Mike             BAL   53  .000     1    0   0   0   0    0    0    0   0    0    0  .000  .000
    Wojey, Pete               BAL    3  .000     1    0   0   0   0    0    1    0   0    0    0  .000  .000
    Code:
    1940 Pitching            Team     IP   ERA    G  GS   W   L  SV    K   BB   R/9
    Veach, Al                 BAL  276.1  2.51   33  33  22   5   0  199   70  9.45
    Dietrich, Bill            BAL  261.1  3.27   32  32  18  10   0  106   61 11.26
    Gardner, Glenn            BAL  247.1  2.26   30  30  20   5   0  149   54  9.46
    Partlow, Roy              BAL  199.2  5.23   30  30  10  14   0   85   89 13.61
    Kramer, Jack              BAL  157.2  3.03   20  20  11   5   0   46   47 10.16
    Palagyi, Mike             BAL   74.1  3.75   53   0   7   7   7   40   27 14.29
    Piechota, Al              BAL   55.1  4.55    8   7   3   4   0   42   12 11.87
    Epperly, Al               BAL   38.0  3.32   26   0   1   3   5   20   16 11.13
    Crowson, Woody            BAL   36.2  4.42   29   0   1   3   2   22   14 13.99
    Zabala, Adrian            BAL   22.1  3.22    6   2   3   1   0    8    6 11.28
    Woodend, George           BAL   17.0  4.24   12   0   1   0   1   19   11 18.00
    Brown, Walter             BAL    5.2  0.00    3   0   0   0   0    7    5 12.71
    Wojey, Pete               BAL    4.0 13.50    3   0   0   0   0    3    4 20.25
    Johnson, Chet             BAL    1.0  0.00    1   0   0   0   0    1    1 27.00




    I think both of us are just glad we're still on top. And very glad we're not the Pirates or Cubs.

    League Leaders

    American League

    Batting: Wes Lariviere (BOS), .332
    Home Runs: Jimmie Foxx (BOS), 39
    RBIs: Jimmie Foxx (BOS)/Luke Easter (BAL), 108

    I seriously, and in all sincerity, hope this information finds anyone in this city who questioned Luke Easter's drive and commitment to the game into question. You know, earlier in the year, when he missed a month because he was hit by a car? And I really, sincerely, hope those people take that information, fold it into sharp corners, and...

    Wins: Red Ruffing (CLE)/Al Veach (BAL), 22
    ERA: Red Ruffing (CLE), 1.99
    Strikeouts: Al Veach (BAL), 199

    So, had Veach pitched the final game instead of Gardner, I might not have had to pay so much to Glenn, and Veach might have won the title outright? You know what? McCarthy had better win.

    National League

    Batting: Wally Moses (CIN), .369
    Home Runs: Johnny Mize (STL), 34
    RBIs: Johnny Mize (STL), 113

    Wins: Bobby Burke (NYG)/Paul Derringer (PHI), 25
    ERA: Don Fisher (PHI), 2.00
    Strikeouts: Bob Feller (CIN), 213

    Willie Weston Update: Everything I said about Willie last month still applies. He's happy, he's a two-time father, he's playing major league baseball...and he's just not doing what I think he could be doing with it. But who am I to say?



    * * *

    Money to Purcell. Surprise!

    Actual surprise - the anonymous letter I receive, based on the same things we pay Purcell for. Along with a suggestion that the people of Baltimore might be a bit put out to find they've been attending baseball games in a stadium that could sink into the harbor at any time. And how it might not be good for us, particularly right before a World Series, if the press were to get wind of this.

    So, yes, it's blackmail. But no demands yet. Just more Milk of Magnesia for me to purchase.
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  3. #1188
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    October 6, 1940 - Game One

    Sure, I've been to the World Series for the past five years. Just haven't taken my team with me, that's all. And it hasn't been in my home park. Those people in the seats haven't been paying the Orioles.

    Need I say how much more I like it this way?

    Baltimore goes all out, again, for its American League champions. The orange and black bunting, the flags - you'd think it was the Republican convention again. Except that everybody in the city likes this one.

    But that does lead to one point. The mayoral candidates, the Congressional candidates, everybody is out today. Democrat Beckett and Republican Miller, each running for mayor, each on hand trying to kiss as many babies as possible before next month's election. Max Broz, son of my erstwhile enemy Mark, now running for City Council, has added himself to the list of VIPs with whom Jim Bandy has been frantically busy since before we even clinched. Naturally, the political world is here, and letting it quietly be known that, if we needed someone to throw out the ceremonial first pitch, why, they'd be honored.

    Not going to happen.

    Baseball royalty is here, as well. Commissioner Kimball, who now looks as though a stiff wind would blow him away, still manages to find enough strength to come in from New York. Actually, that's not quite accurate - Roger Bolton tells me that Kimball has been in Washington with some hush-hush meetings with Administration officials. League presidents Frick and Harridge are here, along with their entourages.

    Bill Veeck is here. Finally, someone I'm happy to see.

    "You're right, my father would be proud," he says when I approach him. "And he'd be happy that your team and mine were facing each other."

    I stop, as I haven't said anything yet. "Hello to you too, Bill," finally comes out. We both chuckle politely. Some small talk, including my chance to ask him a question. The one about the time, back in 1937, after winning that World Series - why did he then release his then-player/manager Jimmie Wilson? "I like to let them know they can be replaced. Makes 'em so much more grateful when I bring 'em back." We laugh, but I know him better, and just look at him. He relents. "Besides, Wilson needed to retire as a player, and wouldn't listen to me. Once I released him, and he saw that he wasn't in demand as a catcher any more, we could talk about it. And as soon as we could, you bet I brought him back!"

    We talk a bit more, and then he wanders off to work on some of the other owners. And I remember that over the past several years he's actually more practiced at this sort of World Series glad-handing than I am.

    Which is to say, his Phillies have been here before. Some of the men on his team were in the '34 Series, and most were there in '37 and '38. Meanwhile, I look at the men on my roster, and find World Series experience in three of them. Keith Agan, Al Veach, and Bill Dietrich were all on our 1935 team. That's it. There are almost as many former Orioles on the Phillies with World Series experience. I'd even forgotten that Fat Freddie Fitzsimmons is still active, but he was 3 - 3 for Jimmie wilson, the man who caught him back in Baltimore. He saw me on the field before the game, and made a point to come over. "Never thought I'd get back here, did you?" he asked with a smile. At 38 I'm not sure that "Fat" really does him justice any more. But he's not the one who'll be pitching against us much, if at all. That fantastic starting rotation will be.

    That's another of the reasons why the sportswriter community give us approxiately a ten percent chance of winning this. In my heart of hearts, that seems low. I'd give us one in five.

    Anyway, the pre-game stuff is about ready. Each team is announced in its entirety, and line the baselines. Then, being escorted onto the field by manager Joe McCarthy is a small woman and three children. Hamilton Stone announces who they are as the players applaud. The boys knew we were going to do this for the first day, and I got pretty general approval.

    When McCarthy has led them to the box, Agan takes his place behind home plate. Jeff Gardner's widow Millie and daughter Beth hold little Billy's hands, while eleven year old Mark rears back and throws the ceremonial pitch.

    I know the applause will be bigger tomorrow, for the men we have in mind then. But I wanted Jeff's family involved in this somehow.

    Al Veach gets the start for us, as his 22 - 5 record would indicate. A 2.51 ERA, too. Al is the highest paid player on my team, at least for now. He's been here for a while. He deserves this. But does he deserve to face one of the best pitchers ever to play the game, in Paul Derringer? 25 - 4, 2.04? 300 wins already, and only 33? That Paul Derringer?

    The game starts about as you'd expect. Nine up, nine down for the Phillies. Nine up, nine down for the Orioles. It's not until the bottom of the fourth when Rizzuto works a rare walk off Derringer. McCarthy then called for the hit and run, and it worked to perfection as Bob Elliott singled and Rizzuto took third, bringing up our big hitters. Luke Easter came up, and...grounded into a double play. But Rizzuto scored! Orioles 1, Phillies 0 Williams doubled, but was left there when Red Marion grounded out. And of course had a harsh exchange of words with Marion between the innings.

    There we stayed until the top of the sixth. Art Mahan hit a slow roller to third that Bob Elliott over-ran when charging, leaving Mahan to beat the throw. After two outs he was on third, but again, there were two outs. And then right fielder Le Grant Scott sent one deep to center field. Spence kept going back, looking for all the world as though he was going to catch it. Then he'd go back further, still looking sure.

    Then it went over the fence. Phillies 2, Orioles 1 The Phillies' first hit off Veach, and it's a two run home run.

    Well, they got a double later, and nothing else. But then, we didn't get much else either. Came the bottom of the ninth, still trailing, and Rizzuto led off by grounding to short. But then Bob Elliott singled. And Luke Easter singled him to third. And Ted Williams singled him home. Orioles 2, Phillies 2 And Red Marion...popped up to short. Two away.

    Keith Agan was 0 for 3. Two pitches later, he wasn't. And the throw to the plate - pinch runner Hal Epps was SAFE!

    Final Score: Orioles 3, Phillies 2

    We may still lose. But we're not exactly pushovers.

    Code:
    Philadelphia Phillies at Baltimore Orioles
    October 6, 1940
    
                         1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 +  R  H  E
          Phillies (PHI) 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0    2  2  1
           Orioles (BAL) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2    3  7  1
    
    PHILADELPHIA                 ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Frankie Crosetti (SS)         4  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .315
    Le Grant Scott (RF)           4  1  0  1  1  2  2  0    .275
    Joe Gordon (2B)               3  0  1  0  0  0  1  0    .243
    Josh Gibson (C)               4  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .269
    Overton Tremper (LF)          3  1  0  0  0  0  1  0    .328
     Enos Slaughter (P)           0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .250
    Ray Dandrige (3B)             3  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .274
    Wild Bill Wright (CF)         3  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .280
    Art Mahan (1B)                3  0  0  1  0  0  0  0    .283
    Paul Derringer (P)            2  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .176
    TOTALS                       29  2  1  2  1  2  9  0
    
       2B:  Overton Tremper
       HR:  Le Grant Scott
    
       DP:  Art Mahan, Joe Gordon, Frankie Crosetti
       E:  Ray Dandrige
    
                PHILADELPHIA   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
              Paul Derringer  8.2  7  1  0  3  3  4 143   2.04
                      TOTALS  8.2  7  1  0  3  3  4 143
    
    BALTIMORE                    ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Snuffy Stirnweiss (2B)        4  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .265
    Phil Rizzuto (SS)             3  0  1  1  0  0  0  0    .278
    Bob Elliott (3B)              4  2  0  1  0  0  1  0    .301
    Luke Easter (1B)              4  1  0  0  0  0  1  0    .275
     Hal Epps (P)                 0  0  0  1  0  0  0  0    .268
    Ted Williams (RF)             4  2  0  0  0  1  0  0    .313
    Red Marion (LF)               4  0  0  0  0  0  2  0    .276
    Keith Agan (C)                4  1  0  0  0  1  0  0    .316
    Stan Spence (CF)              3  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .269
    Al Veach (P)                  2  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .162
     Bob Maier (P)                1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .301
     Mike Palagyi (P)             0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .000
    TOTALS                       33  7  1  3  0  2  4  0
    
       2B:  Ted Williams
       GDP:  Luke Easter
       E:  Bob Elliott
    
                   BALTIMORE   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
                    Al Veach  8.0  2  1  1  2  0  8 110   2.51
                Mike Palagyi  1.0  0  0  0  0  0  1  14   3.75
                      TOTALS  9.0  2  1  1  2  0  9 124
    
         WP: Mike Palagyi
         LP: Paul Derringer
    
         Temperature: 44F
         Wind: 11 MPH (out to center)
         Attendance: 65,031
         Time: 2:54
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  4. #1189
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    October 7, 1940 - Game Two

    I quite liked that. Let's see if we can do it again.

    Today I had the more traditional opening ceremony. That is to say, I had two men come out onto the field who everybody in the stands knew and loved. One was helping the other a bit, but nobody seemed to mind.

    Charlie Gehringer threw to Jim Sheehan. Then Lou Gehrig tossed to Keith Agan.

    Then the crowd, as they say, went wild. If Lou ever forgets how beloved he is in Baltimore, this would do well to remind him.

    Our pitchers today are Steve Gerkin and Glenn Gardner. 24 year old Gardner had the best year of his relatively short career, winning twenty against only five losses, both bests for him. His ERA of 2.26 was well below the 3.67 he'd achieved so far, showing a young man about to come into his own in this league. Gerkin, one of our mid-decade string of Rookies of the Year before I shipped him to Philadelphia when he won arbitration against me in my more cash-strapped years, was "only" 18 wins to the good this year, against eight losses. His ERA was up a bit from last year - 3.50 vs. 3.13, both under his career average of 3.61.

    Just as before, both pitchers started out well, though Gardner was a bit nervous in the first, walking two. However, one of them, Frankie Crosetti, was then caught trying to make something happen on the base paths by his former teammate Keith Agan. It wasn't until the bottom of the fifth that we managed to get three hits in a row, all singles, but enough for a lead. Orioles 1, Phillies 0 Then we were back to scorelessness on both parts.

    Then came the eighth. Oh, the eighth. Phillies center fielder (and, I noticed, a man with a considerable following in our own colored seating section - and no wonder, he'd last played for Baltimore's own Negro League team) Wild Bill Wright led off with a single to left. Art Mahan bunted him to second with one out - so manager Jimmie Wilson is playing for the tie. He also sent Angel Fleitas up to pinch hit for Gerkin, who drew a walk. Now, two on with one out, the 65,031 fans were getting nervous. Even more so when Frankie Crosetti drew another walk, to load the bases, and with yesterday's almost hero Le Grant Scott up. But Scott hit a nice double play ball to second to get us out of the inning and the danger. Except...Snuffy Stirnweiss threw it past Rizzuto covering, and it went into the outfield! By the time it was tracked down, there were runners on the corners, still one out, and Phillies 2, Orioles 1

    Second baseman Joe Gordon struck out. Catcher Josh Gibson...didn't. Phillies 5, Orioles 1 after the home run to left that bounced off the facing of the third deck. I know, because I could hear it hit. I could hear it hit because the crowd was eerily silent as soon as the ball left Gibson's bat. Gardner still needed to get that third out, and Overton Tremper instead singled to right. But Ray Dandridge got just a bit too much under one, and popped it to Rizzuto at short.

    Stirnweiss is 21. This is his second full season, and he played fewer than 100 games. We can't expect the world of him. But I'm sure I wasn't the only person in the park who turned, however slightly, to look at Charlie Gehringer. As if to say, "If you were still here, that wouldn't have happened." Which is horribly unfair to the lad, of course - who can follow a baseball legend?

    Though Luke Easter seems to be doing pretty well.

    Anyway, the bottom of the eighth. Stan Spence, I saw, shaking Stirnweiss' hand before he came up to the plate. Publicly and visibly saying not to worry about it? Not sure. Maybe publicly and visibly saying he'd take care of it, as the first pitch ended up in the left field seats! Phillies 5, Orioles 2 McCarthy brought in Bob Maier to pinch hit for Gardner, and he promptly struck out. This brought Stirnweiss to the plate, and I have to say I'm proud of my fans for the cheer they gave him. Would have been even nicer if he'd done more with it than to weakly ground to short.

    Then we got our chance. Rizzuto singled to left. Bob Elliott hit what should have been the third out to shortstop Crosetti, who tossed it past first! Two in scoring position, two outs. Luke Easter took a mighty swing, and barely hit a nubber in front of the plate. And reached safely when Gibson threw in the dirt. Phillies 5, Orioles 3 The crowd began to get back into the game more - two straight chances to end the threat, two straight errors. Maybe? Well, Hal Epps hit a screaming liner, by far the best hit of the inning, to straighaway center. I will admit I mentally added the run to our tally - until I saw Wright lay out flat to make the catch. Threat over.

    Six outs later, game over.

    Final Score: Phillies 5, Orioles 3

    We proved yesterday that we belong on the same field as the mighty Phillies. Today we proved that we're not so good that we can throw games away. I sincerely hope that's not a lesson we have to learn again.

    Code:
    Philadelphia Phillies at Baltimore Orioles
    October 7, 1940
    
                         1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 +  R  H  E
          Phillies (PHI) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0    5  6  2
           Orioles (BAL) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0    3  6  1
    
    PHILADELPHIA                 ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Frankie Crosetti (SS)         3  1  1  1  0  0  0  0    .315
    Le Grant Scott (RF)           4  0  0  1  0  0  1  0    .275
    Joe Gordon (2B)               2  0  2  0  0  0  1  0    .243
    Josh Gibson (C)               4  1  0  1  1  3  0  0    .269
    Overton Tremper (LF)          4  1  0  0  0  0  1  0    .328
     Enos Slaughter (P)           0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .250
    Ray Dandrige (3B)             4  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .274
    Wild Bill Wright (CF)         4  1  0  1  0  0  1  0    .280
    Art Mahan (1B)                3  1  0  0  0  0  1  0    .283
    Steve Gerkin (P)              1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .165
     Angel Fleitas (P)            0  0  1  1  0  0  0  0    .343
     Herm Holshouser (P)          1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .273
    TOTALS                       30  6  4  5  1  3  5  0
    
       HR:  Josh Gibson
       GDP:  Josh Gibson
       CS:  Frankie Crosetti
    
       DP:  Art Mahan 2, Joe Gordon 2, Ray Dandrige, Frankie Crosetti
       E:  Josh Gibson, Frankie Crosetti
    
                PHILADELPHIA   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
                Steve Gerkin  7.0  4  2  0  1  1  5 101   3.50
             Herm Holshouser  2.0  2  1  1  2  1  1  51   2.11
                      TOTALS  9.0  6  3  1  3  2  6 152
    
    BALTIMORE                    ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Snuffy Stirnweiss (2B)        4  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .265
    Phil Rizzuto (SS)             4  1  0  1  0  0  0  0    .278
    Bob Elliott (3B)              4  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .301
    Luke Easter (1B)              3  0  1  0  0  0  1  0    .275
    Ted Williams (RF)             2  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .313
     Hal Epps (P)                 2  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .268
    Red Marion (LF)               2  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .276
     Johnny Ostrowski (P)         2  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .111
    Keith Agan (C)                3  1  1  1  0  0  1  0    .316
    Stan Spence (CF)              3  2  1  1  1  1  0  0    .269
    Glenn Gardner (P)             2  1  0  0  0  1  0  0    .146
     Bob Maier (P)                1  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .301
     Mike Palagyi (P)             0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .000
     Reggie Otero (P)             1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .280
    TOTALS                       33  6  3  3  1  2  6  0
    
       HR:  Stan Spence
       GDP:  Ted Williams, Glenn Gardner
    
       DP:  Keith Agan, Luke Easter, Snuffy Stirnweiss 2
       E:  Snuffy Stirnweiss
    
                   BALTIMORE   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
               Glenn Gardner  8.0  6  4  1  5  0  3 141   2.26
                Mike Palagyi  1.0  0  0  0  0  0  2  15   3.75
                      TOTALS  9.0  6  4  1  5  0  5 156
    
         WP: Steve Gerkin
         LP: Glenn Gardner
    
         Temperature: 52F
         Wind: Calm
         Attendance: 65,031
         Time: 3:21
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  5. #1190
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    October 9, 1940 - Game Three

    First game in Philadelphia, where they're also getting pretty used to the World Series coming through. Really, half of the past ten Series have gone to Philly, with the A's taking it in 1931 and the Phils losing in '34 and '37, before winning in '38. And I hope losing now, though it appears from the sports reporting world that nobody outside Baltimore gives us much of a chance.

    Today the rookie who has done so well for himself, Jack Kramer, will start against veteran Don Fisher. Kramer is 22 years old, and went 11 - 5, 3.03 this year after being called up. Meanwhile, Fisher...has his second 23 win season, going 23 - 2, and his 2.00 ERA brings his lifetime total down to 2.54. And he's only 24 himself. This year he's making a decent amount of money. After next season, I'd imagine him breaking the bank. Or going to New York, which is almost the same.

    Give credit to Kramer, he held his own against a tough lineup for the first three innings. But a leadoff walk to Josh Gibson, who took second on a wild pitch and third on a ground ball, allowed the first run to score on Ray Dandridge's base hit. Phillies 1, Orioles 0 Wild Bill Wright then singled Dandridge to third, and he scored on Art Mahan's fly ball. Phillies 2, Orioles 0 Fisher himself came up with a chance to make it a big inning, but Kramer buckled down and got him to fly out to Marion in left.

    In the next inning, Frankie Crosetti and Joe Gordon singled, and Josh Gibson is the one who hit the fly ball deep enough for the run to score. Phillies 3, Orioles 0 But, we got that one back in the top of the sixth, with our shortstop getting the single and our cleanup batter doubling to center, just missing a home run. Phillies 3, Orioles 1

    And don't think I didn't notice that some of the names I've mentioned so far are Luke Easter, Josh Gibson, Ray Dandridge, and Wild Bill Wright. Four former Negro league players.

    In the top of the seventh, Red Marion hit one that landed about six inches fair (and about three feet from the outstretched glove of defensive replacement Enos Slaughter) and beat Slaughter's throw to second. Agan went from down 0 - 2 to working a walk, and Stan Spence singled home a run. Phillies 3, Orioles 2 McCarthy brought Johnny Ostrowski in to pinch hit for Kramer, and his ground ball out got the tying run home! Orioles 3, Phillies 3 But Stirnweiss, still trying to compensate for yesterday, struck out, and then Rizzuto followed him down on strikes.

    And there it remained until the bottom of the ninth. Walter Brown came in to pitch for us. Le Grant Scott grounded out to first. And with the dangerous Josh Gibson on deck, Joe Gordon prevented him from having to bat by hitting the 2-2 pitch over the wall in right.

    Final Score: Phillies 4, Orioles 3

    So very close.

    Code:
    Baltimore Orioles at Philadelphia Phillies
    October 9, 1940
    
                         1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 +  R  H  E
           Orioles (BAL) 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0    3  6  0
          Phillies (PHI) 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1    4 11  1
    
    BALTIMORE                    ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Snuffy Stirnweiss (2B)        4  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .265
    Phil Rizzuto (SS)             4  1  0  1  0  0  2  0    .278
    Bob Elliott (3B)              4  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .301
    Luke Easter (1B)              3  1  1  0  0  1  2  0    .275
    Ted Williams (RF)             3  1  1  0  0  0  0  0    .313
    Red Marion (LF)               4  1  0  1  0  0  2  0    .276
    Keith Agan (C)                3  1  1  1  0  0  0  0    .316
    Stan Spence (CF)              4  1  0  0  0  1  0  0    .269
    Jack Kramer (P)               2  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .204
     Johnny Ostrowski (P)         1  0  0  0  0  1  0  0    .111
     Mike Palagyi (P)             0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .000
     Reggie Otero (P)             1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .280
     Walter Brown (P)             0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .197
    TOTALS                       33  6  3  3  0  3  7  0
    
       2B:  Luke Easter, Red Marion
    
       DP:  Luke Easter, Bob Elliott, Snuffy Stirnweiss
    
                   BALTIMORE   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
                 Jack Kramer  6.0  9  1  0  3  3  1 111   3.03
                Mike Palagyi  2.0  1  3  0  0  0  1  46   3.75
                Walter Brown  0.1  1  0  1  1  1  0   9   5.23
                      TOTALS  8.1 11  4  1  4  4  2 166
    
    PHILADELPHIA                 ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Frankie Crosetti (SS)         4  3  1  1  0  0  0  0    .315
    Le Grant Scott (RF)           4  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .275
    Joe Gordon (2B)               5  2  0  1  1  1  0  0    .243
    Josh Gibson (C)               1  0  2  1  0  1  1  0    .269
    Overton Tremper (LF)          3  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .328
     Enos Slaughter (P)           1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .250
    Ray Dandrige (3B)             4  2  0  1  0  1  0  0    .274
    Wild Bill Wright (CF)         4  3  0  0  0  0  1  0    .280
    Art Mahan (1B)                2  0  1  0  0  1  0  0    .283
    Don Fisher (P)                3  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .129
     Angel Fleitas (P)            1  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .343
     Herm Holshouser (P)          0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .273
    TOTALS                       32 11  4  4  1  4  2  0
    
       2B:  Ray Dandrige, Wild Bill Wright
       HR:  Joe Gordon
       GDP:  Art Mahan
       E:  Frankie Crosetti
    
                PHILADELPHIA   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
                  Don Fisher  8.0  6  3  0  3  3  7 157   2.00
             Herm Holshouser  1.0  0  0  0  0  0  0  13   2.11
                      TOTALS  9.0  6  3  0  3  3  7 170
    
         WP: Herm Holshouser
         LP: Walter Brown
    
         Temperature: 56F
         Wind: Calm
         Attendance: 38,000
         Time: 3:23
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  6. #1191
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    Posts
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    October 10, 1940 - Game Four

    Next day, back at the same park, with the extra 5,000 seats crammed in. We had some conversation before the game, the other executives and I, about expansion. They're still very serious about doing it. I'm still against it, and for a reason that they don't seem to want to think about much.

    Ten years ago, we were set to expand by four cities. Somehow we were going to include two cities on the west coast, which I still don't think I could figure out. We had the money from the ownership groups, we had the pitches by the cities. We were set.

    Then the market crashed, the economy took a dive, and nobody could afford to even think of expansion.

    Now, that worked out well for both teams playing today. With Chicago left open, Phil Ball's St. Louis Browns moved there, and we got some more money over the years from their greater attendance, plus the sword of Damocles that was the threat that we'd be sent back to the Windy City was removed. And since Bill Veeck's father couldn't get a team in Chicago, he used his money to buy the one in Philadelphia.

    So what does that have to do with anything now? Well, there's this war in Europe, see. And I think it's going to be a war involving America before too long. Which will, once again, do funny things to our economy.

    I'm not saying we shouldn't do it. I'm saying we should wait a couple of years to see how matters shake out.

    My opinion is the minority view. As I expected.

    And so, on to the game. Today we'd see Bill Dietrich (18 - 10, 3.27) against Paul Derringer. Everybody assumed that Derringer would be so far superior that it wouldn't be close. Everybody except me. And the others on the team. I'm just expecting good pitching.

    I looked to be disappointed, but in a good way. After two quick groundouts, Bob Elliott singled to right. Luke Easter followed it with a two run home run, and just that quickly we were on the board! Orioles 2, Phillies 0

    Dietrich was fine in the first, but Overton Tremper led off the second with a double. A couple of ground ball outs later, they'd halved the distance between us. Orioles 2, Phillies 1

    Then, a couple of frames of zeroes on both sides. In the bottom of the fifth, the leadoff double struck again, this time from Art Mahan. A bunt, a couple of outs, and we were close to escaping, but not close enough. Joe Gordon singled. Phillies 2, Orioles 2

    Then came the sixth. Overton Tremper singled, went to third on Wright's single, and broke for home on Art Mahan's ground ball. Without that, it would have been a double play to end the inning. It should have been, but Bob Elliott at third went for the lead runner at the plate. Got him, too, but that kept the inning going. So when Derringer himself singled, he drove in the go-ahead run. Phillies 3, Orioles 2

    And that's where we stayed. We got some hits, but nothing that would get anybody around. After that one pitch mistake to Easter, Derringer pitched like a man who'd won 300 games so far.

    Final Score: Phillies 3, Orioles 2

    Well, this is turning out just about the way everybody expected it. I know the fans of the city are expecting to come tomorrow for the final game of the year. I'm more than half expecting it myself, but with that little bit of hope that it will just be the last home game for them.

    Very little bit of hope, mind you...

    Code:
    Baltimore Orioles at Philadelphia Phillies
    October 10, 1940
    
                         1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 +  R  H  E
           Orioles (BAL) 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0    2  7  0
          Phillies (PHI) 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 x    3  8  0
    
    BALTIMORE                    ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Snuffy Stirnweiss (2B)        4  1  0  0  0  0  1  0    .265
    Phil Rizzuto (SS)             4  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .278
    Bob Elliott (3B)              4  1  0  1  0  0  0  0    .301
    Luke Easter (1B)              4  3  0  1  1  2  0  0    .275
     Hal Epps (P)                 0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .268
    Ted Williams (RF)             4  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .313
    Red Marion (LF)               4  1  0  0  0  0  1  0    .276
    Keith Agan (C)                3  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .316
    Stan Spence (CF)              3  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .269
    Bill Dietrich (P)             2  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .110
     Bob Maier (P)                1  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .301
     Mike Palagyi (P)             0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .000
    TOTALS                       33  7  0  2  1  2  6  0
    
       HR:  Luke Easter
       CS:  Luke Easter
    
                   BALTIMORE   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
               Bill Dietrich  7.0  8  2  0  3  3  4 133   3.27
                Mike Palagyi  1.0  0  0  0  0  0  1  14   3.75
                      TOTALS  8.0  8  2  0  3  3  5 147
    
    PHILADELPHIA                 ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Frankie Crosetti (SS)         4  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .315
    Le Grant Scott (RF)           3  0  1  0  0  0  0  0    .275
    Joe Gordon (2B)               4  3  0  0  0  1  0  0    .243
    Josh Gibson (C)               4  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .269
    Overton Tremper (LF)          3  2  0  1  0  0  0  0    .328
     Enos Slaughter (P)           1  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .250
    Ray Dandrige (3B)             4  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .274
    Wild Bill Wright (CF)         3  1  1  1  0  0  1  0    .280
    Art Mahan (1B)                3  1  0  1  0  1  0  1    .283
    Paul Derringer (P)            2  1  0  0  0  1  1  0    .176
    TOTALS                       31  8  2  3  0  3  5  1
    
       2B:  Art Mahan, Overton Tremper
    
                PHILADELPHIA   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
              Paul Derringer  9.0  7  0  1  2  2  6 141   2.04
                      TOTALS  9.0  7  0  1  2  2  6 141
    
         WP: Paul Derringer
         LP: Bill Dietrich
    
         Temperature: 49F
         Wind: 4 MPH (out to center)
         Attendance: 38,000
         Time: 2:44
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  7. #1192
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    Posts
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    October 11, 1940 - Game Five

    So, shall we try to stave off elimination today? I certainly hope so.

    The pitchers today are Veach and Gerkin. Veach deserved to get that first win, but didn't. Gerkin probably shouldn't have in game two, but did.

    Neither allows a hit in the first. In the second, we break on top again through a single by Luke Easter, a couple of ground ball outs, and another single by Keith Agan. Orioles 1, Phillies 0 But then, Agan went for the extra base. Generally it's not a good idea for your catcher to try to outrun a play. This time was no exception. I'm pretty sure Joe Gordon had time to not only read, but possibly write a book while waiting for Agan to arrive after the throw.

    But then, in the third, we struck again. Stan Spence led off with a single and took second, very alertly, when left fielder Overton Tremper bobbled the ball. Al Veach's single put runners at the corners, again probably wisely and alertly. Nobody really wanted to challenge the outfield arm of Wild Bill Wright for a second time. Hey, maybe Agan's running blunder did work out after all. Especially when, one out later, Phil Rizzuto grounded to second. Joe Gordon went for the double play, but Rizzuto just beat the throw, and I don't care what anybody in Philadelphia tells you, he did beat it. Orioles 2, Phillies 0

    And then the zeroes kept coming. Until the bottom of the fifth, in which Ray Dandridge led off with a single, and Wright followed with a double, putting two in scoring position with nobody out. And Veach got a ground ball to short, a ground ball to second, and a fly ball to right. Orioles 2, Phillies 1, and I began to breathe again.

    By the bottom of the seventh, they got runners on the corners with two outs, and were ready to score that tying run. The crowd was not only wanting it, they were expecting it. I probably was too, particularly when Wilson took Gerkin out and put up young Enos Slaughter to pinch hit. But Veach didn't get to be who he is without some skills, and took two pitches to get Slaughter to pop up to Rizzuto. Threat averted - and the feeling of my heart in my throat when Slaughter was announced tells me that I need to see about getting him on my team as soon as I can.

    In the eighth, they had Crosetti on second with two outs and Josh Gibson up. I don't know who called for it, whether it was Veach, Agan, pitching coach Schaute, or manager McCarthy, but somebody decided that walking Gibson intentionally was a good idea. Somebody was right, as Veach struck Overton Tremper out with two on.

    Then came the ninth. Ray Dandridge hit the first pitch for a double. Veach, who had to be tired, surely didn't look it, and refused Schaute the ball when he went to the mound. At least, that's how it looked to me - Schaute swears he never asked for it, and Al's not talking. He then proved his mettle by striking out Wright, who'd doubled already in the game. We then issued another intentional pass, to Art Mahan, to bring up reliever Herm Holshouser. Angel Fleitas came in to bat for Holshouser, but Veach struck him out looking, in a call that even I might, under pressure, admit was that of an umpire ready to go home for the day. And the call served two purposes - got Fleitas out, and made Crosetti angry enough to swing wildly and get too much under one, popping out to Rizzuto to end the game.

    Final Score: Orioles 2, Phillies 1

    Nice pitching performances all around, and the lack of hitting continues. Something of a surprise to the Philly faithful, that they're going to have to go to Baltimore. Something of a surprise to my fellow executives, too - Walter Briggs flat out admits that he needs to make travel arrangements because he never expected to have to come back. "Hell, Charlie, I thought you'd be done in four."

    We're not.

    Code:
    Baltimore Orioles at Philadelphia Phillies
    October 11, 1940
    
                         1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 +  R  H  E
           Orioles (BAL) 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0    2  9  0
          Phillies (PHI) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0    1  6  2
    
    BALTIMORE                    ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Snuffy Stirnweiss (2B)        5  0  0  0  0  0  2  0    .265
    Phil Rizzuto (SS)             3  0  2  0  0  1  0  1    .278
    Bob Elliott (3B)              5  0  0  0  0  0  2  0    .301
    Luke Easter (1B)              4  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .275
    Ted Williams (RF)             3  1  0  1  0  0  0  0    .313
     Hal Epps (P)                 1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .268
    Red Marion (LF)               3  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .276
     Johnny Ostrowski (P)         1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .111
    Keith Agan (C)                4  4  0  0  0  1  0  0    .316
    Stan Spence (CF)              3  1  1  1  0  0  1  0    .269
    Al Veach (P)                  4  1  0  0  0  0  1  0    .162
    TOTALS                       36  9  3  2  0  2  6  1
    
       2B:  Keith Agan
    
                   BALTIMORE   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
                    Al Veach  9.0  6  3  0  1  1  8 163   2.51
                      TOTALS  9.0  6  3  0  1  1  8 163
    
    PHILADELPHIA                 ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Frankie Crosetti (SS)         5  1  0  0  0  0  1  0    .315
    Le Grant Scott (RF)           3  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .275
    Joe Gordon (2B)               4  0  0  0  0  0  3  0    .243
    Josh Gibson (C)               2  0  2  0  0  0  0  0    .269
    Overton Tremper (LF)          4  0  0  0  0  0  2  0    .328
    Ray Dandrige (3B)             4  3  0  1  0  0  0  0    .274
    Wild Bill Wright (CF)         3  1  0  0  0  0  1  0    .280
    Art Mahan (1B)                3  1  1  0  0  1  0  0    .283
    Steve Gerkin (P)              2  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .165
     Enos Slaughter (P)           1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .250
     Herm Holshouser (P)          0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .273
     Angel Fleitas (P)            1  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .343
    TOTALS                       32  6  3  1  0  1  8  0
    
       2B:  Ray Dandrige 2, Wild Bill Wright
       HBP:  Wild Bill Wright
       E:  Joe Gordon, Overton Tremper
    
                PHILADELPHIA   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
                Steve Gerkin  7.0  8  2  0  2  2  4 135   3.50
             Herm Holshouser  2.0  1  1  0  0  0  2  35   2.11
                      TOTALS  9.0  9  3  0  2  2  6 170
    
         WP: Al Veach
         LP: Steve Gerkin
    
         Temperature: 46F
         Wind: 6 MPH (right to left)
         Attendance: 38,000
         Time: 3:43
    Last edited by birdsin89; 11-14-2014 at 08:42 AM.
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  8. #1193
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    1,479

    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    October 13, 1940 - Game Six

    One of the reasons I'm so glad we're back in Baltimore is, naturally, the money. I won't lie, it's very nice to have a full house of people paying World Series prices for tickets.

    Another reason is just the simple fact that it means we still have a chance. The day before yesterday, I wasn't sure we did.

    But another important reason is the personal one. Glenn Gardner deserved better than what he got in game two. He didn't allow an earned run, but still got five runs charged to him because of Stirnweiss' error. He'll get a chance to rectify that today.

    And who knows - if we win the Series, maybe the error will be forgotten too.

    Today he's pitching against a young man with a great future ahead of him. Or an old man with a great past behind him. Or, possibly, both.

    Satchel Paige may have been born in 1906. He may not. He may have been born in 1900, or even a bit earlier. He may not. He may have been born on the fourth of July. He may not. He's not telling. He tells wonderful stories, and may need to get a radio show some time to tell them all, but none of them seem to be about his birth.

    And they don't have to be. He's a good pitcher, and seems to be getting better, not worse as you'd expect of a man of his age. Especially considering he throws nothing but fastballs, for the most part.

    So the game begins. We had a couple of hits in the first, and a chance to score, but Snuffy Stirnweiss, who led off with a double, was tagged out at home on Bob Elliott's ground ball. Nothing.

    In the second, nothing. Third, fourth, fifth, sixth, nothing. Oh sure, each side got some hits, but never closer than second base to scoring. Gardner didn't even allow most of the hits, and somehow ours were never quite enough.

    In the seventh, we got runners on the corners with one out, and nobody scored. Both sides went 1 - 2 - 3 in the eighth, by which time Gardner was done and Mike Palagyi was in. Came the ninth, and Paige was done as well, and it was already in the books as one of the greatest pitching performances in the almost-40-year history of the World Series.

    But that was for later. The game was still going on. In the top of the ninth, Lee Hadley batted for Paige, and singled. He got to second when Le Grant Scott was again given an intentional pass. And then, with Josh Gibson on deck...nothing happened. Joe Gordon popped out to Stirnweiss, and we went to the bottom of the ninth.

    Herm Holshouser came in for the Phillies. We had our power due up, in Easter and Williams. Easter struck out. Williams grounded to short, and took out what I think is a record twentieth dugout water cooler of the year. Red Marion hit a sharp grounder to third baseman Dandridge, which he knocked down only by the greatest of effort. Still, by the time Dandridge game up with it, Marion was just able to beat the throw. An infield hit, our eighth hit of the day against their four. Keith Agan was next.

    A long fly ball to right-center...

    Wright goes back for it, still going, still going...

    It's...just out of reach, and rolling to the wall! Marion is almost to third, and gets there before Wright can pick it up.

    Coach Lewis Mack is waving Marion on. He heads for the plate.

    There's no throw from Gordon, the cutoff man. It's too late.

    Final Score: Orioles 1, Phillies 0

    It's a good thing Junior Purcell keeps filling in under the stadium. Because the sheer vibrations from the sound that arises should by all rights have sent us sinking into the harbor.

    We'll be back one more time.

    Forget my ulcer - my heart can't take this.

    Code:
    Philadelphia Phillies at Baltimore Orioles
    October 13, 1940
    
                         1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 +  R  H  E
          Phillies (PHI) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0    0  4  0
           Orioles (BAL) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1    1  9  0
    
    PHILADELPHIA                 ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Frankie Crosetti (SS)         4  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .315
    Le Grant Scott (RF)           3  1  1  0  0  0  1  0    .275
    Joe Gordon (2B)               4  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .243
    Josh Gibson (C)               3  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .269
    Overton Tremper (LF)          3  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .328
    Ray Dandrige (3B)             3  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .274
    Wild Bill Wright (CF)         3  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .280
    Art Mahan (1B)                3  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .283
    Satchel Paige (P)             2  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .123
     Lee Handley (P)              1  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .341
     Herm Holshouser (P)          0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .273
    TOTALS                       29  4  1  0  0  0  5  0
    
       GDP:  Joe Gordon, Wild Bill Wright
    
       DP:  Art Mahan 2, Joe Gordon 2, Ray Dandrige, Frankie Crosetti
    
                PHILADELPHIA   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
             Satchel Paige    8.0  7  0  0  0  0  0 113   4.38
             Herm Holshouser  0.2  2  0  0  1  1  1  19   2.11
                      TOTALS  8.2  9  0  0  1  1  1 132
    
    BALTIMORE                    ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Snuffy Stirnweiss (2B)        4  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .265
    Phil Rizzuto (SS)             4  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .278
    Bob Elliott (3B)              3  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .301
    Luke Easter (1B)              4  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .275
    Ted Williams (RF)             4  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .313
    Red Marion (LF)               4  1  0  1  0  0  0  0    .276
    Keith Agan (C)                4  2  0  0  0  1  0  0    .316
    Stan Spence (CF)              3  3  0  0  0  0  0  0    .269
    Glenn Gardner (P)             2  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .146
     Johnny Ostrowski (P)         1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .111
     Mike Palagyi (P)             0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .000
    TOTALS                       33  9  0  1  0  1  1  0
    
       2B:  Keith Agan, Snuffy Stirnweiss
       HBP:  Bob Elliott
       GDP:  Luke Easter, Glenn Gardner
    
       DP:  Luke Easter 2, Snuffy Stirnweiss 2, Phil Rizzuto 2
    
                   BALTIMORE   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
               Glenn Gardner  7.0  3  0  0  0  0  5  93   2.26
                Mike Palagyi  2.0  1  1  0  0  0  0  35   3.75
                      TOTALS  9.0  4  1  0  0  0  5 128
    
         WP: Mike Palagyi
         LP: Herm Holshouser
    
         Temperature: 42F
         Wind: 5 MPH (out to center)
         Attendance: 65,031
         Time: 2:50
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  9. #1194
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    6,390

    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    What a series! The icing on the cake would be an O's win!

  10. #1195
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    1,479

    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    ewing6: Yes it would, wouldn't it? Thanks as always.

    October 14, 1940 - Game Seven

    I love a good game seven. Is there anything in sports more exciting? The winner take all, do or die, or various other cliches. The stakes are as high as can be.

    I love a good game seven.

    Shame this wasn't it.

    Years from now, people will look and see the final score, and remark about the wonderful World Series in which no game was decided by more than two runs, and five of the seven were one run contests.

    But, I'm getting ahead of myself.

    Jack Kramer got the nod for us. Let's think about that a bit, all right? Jack Kramer, who began the season in Norfolk, got to start game seven of the World Series. Bill Dietrich, who had won 18 games this year, and had been around the league for years, and had been in a World Series before this, didn't. Jack Kramer did.

    Not since the Red Ruffing/Lefty Gomez incidents have I had as much disagreement with my manager over his pitching selection in a World Series.

    Meanwhile, the Phillies went with Don Fisher. Right, twenty game winner, 2.00 ERA, Cy Young award winner, four time All Star.

    Maybe this is why people didn't think we had a chance.

    Kramer started the first by getting Crosetti and Scott out, fairly quickly. Then Joe Gordon hit one out to right center. Phillies 1, Orioles 0 The crowd noise had barely subsided when Kramer threw his next pitch, to Josh Gibson. Phillies 2, Orioles 0

    A veteran might have recovered. Kramer might, some day. But not today. Ray Dandridge led off the second with a walk, and scored on Art Mahan's double. Phillies 3, Orioles 0 Fisher was up next, and hit a hot shot to Rizzuto, who overthrew Easter at first. Phillies 4, Orioles 0 Ted Williams' double in the bottom of the second wasn't enough to do anything by himself, and it was a pretty quiet crowd watching the game now. Except for the noise Williams was making in berating his teammates for leaving him stranded - and the scattered boos from the home crowd near the dugout, directed, I think, at his antics.

    Even quieter in the top of the third, when Overton Tremper hit one over the fence in left. Phillies 5, Orioles 0 Three home runs. And still, no sign of Joe Schaute, or Joe McCarthy. Ray Dandridge singled. No manager, no coach. Bill Wright drew a walk. No manager, no coach. Art Mahan drew another, loading the bases. Finally, finally, Schaute came to the mound.

    Kramer violated one of the game's unwritten rules, then, by not waiting for Schaute to reach him. He threw the ball to his coach when he was still half way to the mound. Actually, I'm not sure that's quite right. He may have thrown the ball at his coach.

    And I don't blame him a bit.

    Even moreso, because the next batter was the weak-hitting pitcher, Fisher. Who, naturally, struck out. Which Kramer could have probably done himself.

    George Woodend, our reliever, held them off for a decent length of time, but as we continued to come up and squander chances, the odds of a comeback grew longer and longer. By the eighth, we'd seen enough zeroes on the scoreboard. So Josh Gibson hit his second home run of the day, to left. Phillies 6, Orioles 0

    Well, it's been a good season.

    And I can be pleased that so few fans left the park at that point. They can't all have been down from Philadelphia.

    Wait, remember I started this by talking about it being a relatively close game? Well, here came the eighth inning. Bob Maier was sent in to pinch hit for Woodend, who'd done an admirable job of putting out the fire for the most part. Maier drew a walk - is Fisher finally tiring? Snuffy Stirnweiss, who has to be seeing that game two error that brought us here in his nightmares, still showed a lot of spunk for someone as young as he is. The 1 - 1 triple didn't hurt. Phillies 6, Orioles 1 Rizzuto grounded to Crosetti, who looked Stirnweiss back and then threw Scooter out. Bob Elliott then came up, and jumped on Fisher's first pitch - and put it over the fence! Phillies 6, Orioles 3 And for the second time in this game, it happened. Easter came up, while the cheers for Elliott were still ringing around the ball park. Two pitches later, Easter was trotting around the base path, the ball was in the seats, and the fans were cheering themselves hoarse! Phillies 6, Orioles 4 Ted Williams is next, and we're on a big roll. Even the perpetually smiling Veeck isn't smiling as much.

    Williams hits a sharp grounder in the hole at short. And somehow Crosetti comes up with it, and beats the Kid to first. And the air goes out of the park again, though that may have been partially a crowd reaction to the word Williams exclaimed, audible to an amazing number of the seats, when he was out at first. Red Marion slaps a line shot to the gap in left-center. And somehow it hangs up just long enough for the diving Wild Bill Wright to get it. Two truly great plays. The kind champions make.

    Mike Palagyi comes in for us, and a couple of them get on base. But he gets Crow to ground into a double play and Le Grant Scott to ground out to Scooter, and it's down to the bottom of the ninth.

    After Agan grounds a hard one to third, Stan Spence draws a walk off Herm Holshouser. He even gets second, because let's face it, his run doesn't matter much. Reggie Otero comes in to pinch hit for Palagyi, but strikes out. And the one man who I was hoping wouldn't come up, but the one who had to, is next. Snuffy Stirnweiss. No pressure at all, just the man with one last chance to not be the goat of the 1940 World Series.

    A ground ball to third. Dandridge has it, and throws to first.

    Final Score: Phillies 6, Orioles 4

    The Philadelphia Phillies are 1940 World Champions

    I make the rounds of the other executives, with Mr. Hoffberger and Bud. They're all typically gracious, complimenting us on a good Series, and so forth. Veeck is very warm, slapping me on the back and saying a few words he learned from his father. No, I won't share them.

    The three of us go to the clubhouse, where the boys are quietly changing and getting ready to go. Stirnweiss may be shedding a few un-manly tears as he dresses.

    We shouldn't have even been here. Despite what the Sporting News thought back in March, we were replacing not one but two legends, and shouldn't have even been here. But we fought through it, and made it. So close.

    And I can't even tell myself to wait 'til next year, because I suspect next year I won't have the same quality of players.

    But as I'm leaving the park, I hear a son ask his father, "Dad, we'll do it next year, right?" And the father says, "Of course, son."

    Darn. If the kid believes it, I sort of have to.

    Next year starts tomorrow.

    Code:
    Philadelphia Phillies at Baltimore Orioles
    October 14, 1940
    
                         1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 +  R  H  E
          Phillies (PHI) 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0    6  7  0
           Orioles (BAL) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0    4  6  2
    
    PHILADELPHIA                 ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Frankie Crosetti (SS)         5  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .315
    Le Grant Scott (RF)           5  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .275
    Joe Gordon (2B)               4  1  0  1  1  1  1  0    .243
    Josh Gibson (C)               4  2  0  2  2  2  0  0    .269
    Overton Tremper (LF)          4  1  0  1  1  1  0  0    .328
     Enos Slaughter (P)           0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .250
    Ray Dandrige (3B)             3  1  1  1  0  0  1  0    .274
    Wild Bill Wright (CF)         3  0  1  0  0  0  1  0    .280
    Art Mahan (1B)                3  2  1  1  0  1  0  0    .283
    Don Fisher (P)                3  0  0  0  0  0  2  0    .129
     Lee Handley (P)              1  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .341
     Herm Holshouser (P)          0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .273
    TOTALS                       35  7  3  6  4  5  5  0
    
       2B:  Art Mahan
       HR:  Josh Gibson 2, Joe Gordon, Overton Tremper
       GDP:  Frankie Crosetti
    
       DP:  Art Mahan, Frankie Crosetti, Don Fisher
    
                PHILADELPHIA   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
                  Don Fisher  8.0  6  4  2  4  4  3 149   2.00
             Herm Holshouser  1.0  0  1  0  0  0  1  13   2.11
                      TOTALS  9.0  6  5  2  4  4  4 162
    
    BALTIMORE                    ab  h bb  r hr bi  k sb     avg
    Snuffy Stirnweiss (2B)        5  1  0  1  0  1  0  0    .265
    Phil Rizzuto (SS)             4  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .278
    Bob Elliott (3B)              4  2  0  1  1  2  0  0    .301
    Luke Easter (1B)              3  1  1  1  1  1  1  0    .275
    Ted Williams (RF)             4  1  0  0  0  0  0  0    .313
    Red Marion (LF)               3  0  1  0  0  0  1  0    .276
    Keith Agan (C)                3  0  1  0  0  0  1  0    .316
    Stan Spence (CF)              3  0  1  0  0  0  0  0    .269
    Jack Kramer (P)               0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .204
     George Woodend (P)           2  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .000
     Bob Maier (P)                0  0  1  1  0  0  0  0    .301
     Mike Palagyi (P)             0  0  0  0  0  0  0  0    .000
     Reggie Otero (P)             1  0  0  0  0  0  1  0    .280
    TOTALS                       32  6  5  4  2  4  4  0
    
       2B:  Phil Rizzuto, Ted Williams
       3B:  Snuffy Stirnweiss
       HR:  Luke Easter, Bob Elliott
       GDP:  George Woodend
    
       DP:  Luke Easter, Snuffy Stirnweiss, Phil Rizzuto
       E:  Luke Easter, Phil Rizzuto
    
                   BALTIMORE   ip  h bb hr  r er  k pit    ERA
                 Jack Kramer  2.2  5  3  3  5  4  0  68   3.03
              George Woodend  5.1  1  0  1  1  1  5  74   4.24
                Mike Palagyi  1.0  1  0  0  0  0  0  13   3.75
                      TOTALS  9.0  7  3  4  6  5  5 155
    
         WP: Don Fisher
         LP: Jack Kramer
         SV: Herm Holshouser
    
         Temperature: 43F
         Wind: 6 MPH (out to left)
         Attendance: 65,031
         Time: 3:26
    Last edited by birdsin89; 11-14-2014 at 08:48 AM.
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  11. #1196
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ashley, MI
    Posts
    1,868

    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    To be honest I am more looking forward to next offseason. Seeing as you have one "quiet" one left.

  12. #1197
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    1,479

    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    jshaw: Umm...thanks? And as I've hinted, it wasn't all that quiet in the run-up either. As some players will find...

    * * *

    October, 1940

    What do 1925, 1929, 1932 and 1940 all have in common?

    The Orioles lost the World Series in seven games.

    Don't get me wrong, please. Over the past sixteen seasons, we've won nine American League pennants. Throw in the two one-game playoffs in the twenties, and we've got a track record that anyone outside of New York would kill to have.

    And heck, even the Giants haven't been there since '32.

    But it's just so frustrating! To come so close, so often, and find a way to lose. Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory.

    I know, this year I should just be happy we made it to seven games. I can't really complain when nobody not wearing orange and black even thought we'd go that far.

    Well, actually I can. And will.

    * * *

    So where does everything leave us? Where do we stand now, the day before arbitration for all sixteen teams?

    Not too bad, really. We have vastly more money in the bank than I could have hoped for. Not at all enough to let us make the annual payment on The Loan, of course, But here's the catch - we don't have to any more. The Loan is gone, we've paid it off, and what we have now we get to keep.

    Except for what we give to Junior Purcell. And I've been thinking about that.

    Years ago, his father suggested that there was a way for his crew to actually fix the stadium, not just continue to prop it up. At the time, it was going to run in the two or three million dollar range, as I recall. Preposterous for us even to consider it, especially during the Depression.

    But there are unmistakable signs that the American economy is beginning to prove too strong for even the New Deal to keep it down forever. And I measure that in the most direct possible way. More people are coming to baseball games, and from what I read, going to movies. Listening to radio, and buying the products they hear advertised there. Admittedly, there may be a greater than average component of "eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow ye die" to all this, with a war looming over all. But it's real.

    So what if we fix the place up? If it's going to take two million dollars, well, over the course of another Loan, as long as we manage our player salaries and expenses properly - and I think I've proven we can do that - would it be worth it? Not for me, but for whoever my successor is.

    No, I'm not planning on going anywhere, though of course options are always open. But I've been thinking about the future. And how I still have one. Which is more than I could say for poor Jeff.

    I also have my ulcer. I've had it, or one like it, for so long that I think I should give it a name. Heck, it's acting up right now - sure, the audit appears to be over for now, and the beer license matter is resolved. But a couple of days ago, a formal letter from the local zoning board arrived. More headaches, and I'm getting more and more tempted to just find the local zoning administrator and buy him off. Which also isn't like me.

    I've had my winter colds which get harder to shake and which lay me up longer every year. Based on the past ten years experience, I guess there will be at least a month of separated days in which I will not feel up to coming to work, but will do it anyway, before next season.

    And I have grandchildren who I've never seen, and would like to. I have a wife who I used to not just love, but also like spending time around, and while that's not always the case any more, oddly I think that vacation time, or some other change, might help.

    So I'm not planning on going anywhere any time soon. But eventually I will leave, in one way or another. And when I do, it surely would be nice to not only leave the next guy with a legacy to live up to, but the financial wherewithal to do it. And that does not include having to pay a construction team large and getting larger sums every month to effectively throw into a hole in the ground.

    No, it's not something I'd do on my own. The board would have to approve, and in order to propose it, I'd have to do something I am also finding harder to do. I'd have to stay awake at a board meeting.

    But the thought of taking on debt, maybe a year or two from now if we can build up any savings, to get us out of debt for good? I can work with that.

    Tomorrow, of course, I have to work on insulting Ted Williams, Phil Rizzuto, Glenn Gardner, Bob Elliott, Jim Sheehan, and more by telling them they're not worth whatever it is they want from me. Which means that, by tomorrow night, I may be forgetting even the possibility of saving up any money in the future.

    * * *

    So, can I sign anybody before arbitration? Legally, yes. But actually?

    Williams says no. Bob Elliott says yes, and he wants $15,000 to start. He batted .301, his highest ever. He made the All-Star team for the first time. But I've heard that he wants to stay here for longer than his starting offer. I offer seven years at $10,500. He surprises me by agreeing, and that one's done. Maybe his two month injury helped keep his price down.

    Glenn Gardner says no. Phil Rizzuto says no. Red Marion surprises me by agreeing to talk, but then says he wants a short contract to make sure I actually get him into games. I can't promise anything, but am willing to talk. He's actually reasonable, wants $4,600 for two years. I counter with $3,700, he gets me up $100, and we're done.

    Finally, Jim Sheehan is a backup catcher, which I've learned over the years is more important than one might think. He'd like to be a regular, and thinks New York would be a fine place to be, but he's willing to listen. He wants $7,000. He'll get $5,800. And if I sign a decent catcher in the off season, or one of the kids is ready to move up, I'll trade him and give him the chance to start.

    I could do all these because Mr. Hoffberger, accepting reality, has increased my "don't even ask, just do it" limit to $15,000, and his "ask me first, but it's probably yes" limit to $23,500. With Gardner, Rizzuto, and Williams due for arbitration tomorrow, I suspect I'm going to need that.

    * * *

    So, let's start my day. First, before anyone else shows up, I find a note that Colleen took from a 'phone call that I must have missed yesterday. Minor league catcher Ray Thomas is retiring. Which means I need to find another minor league catcher, doesn't it? Another outfielder too, as Pete Fox is equally tired of riding the busses in Norfolk, or Charlotte, or where ever I put him.

    Around 9:30 I head over to the 1001 Hotel, at, creatively enough, 1001 St. Paul Street.


    The 1001

    Again, neutral territory. By 10, Phil Rizzuto is there. He makes his case, and the 24 year old has a pretty good case to make. This year he slumped badly, batting .278, and I have to wonder if he's still feeling the effects of being hit in the head last year. Maybe he did try to come back too soon. Then again, his lifetime average over the past four years is .311. He gets on base. He scores runs. And he's a good fielder. I, of course, push the .278 for all it's worth.

    He wants over $14,000. He'll get $13,000, for now. Which, remember, is still just over ten times more than he made this year.

    Then comes Ted Williams. Of all the Hank Barry trades I made, this is just about the only one I liked at the time. It was hard not to. The Kid is a baseball player, plain and simple. He wants to play. More specifically, he wants to hit, sometimes to the detriment of his fielding, baserunning, and so forth.

    He also wants $24,000. Which is less than he asked for earlier in the year. I accentuate the slow speed, the five errors in left, the average that dropped this year, the home run total down by eight. I also know that I'm talking to, and more importantly in front of, a 22 year old who has shown temper problems in the past, as Macey White will attest. Heck, as anyone who's ever been to our ballpark, or any ball park, will attest. And yes, because I have to, I bring up the attitude problems, and the fines, and all of that too.

    The arbitrator sees things my way. He usually does, which mostly makes me wonder why the players still trust the arbitration process. So Williams is still on the team, for $19,900. Williams is shooting daggers at me the whole time, and never more than when he leaves the room. I don't blame him for that, though.

    And finally, after lunch, comes the one I've been dreading. Not because he's that crucial to our team, but because his inflated opinion of himself means this is going to be bad whether I win or lose. Sure enough, Glenn Gardner, 20 - 5 this year, but 11 - 7 last, wants $44,600! I'm tempted to just cut him loose, but then I'd get nothing for him. But I can't even offer him anything that isn't going to get laughed out of the room, and he knows it.

    And it doesn't matter, because I lose the arbitration. $44,600 it will be. For a month or two.
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  13. #1198
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    October, 1940

    What happened elsewhere?

    Let's start with what didn't happen. The Red Sox didn't let Jimmie Foxx escape. Double X was on the down swing this year - he only batted .280, which is far below his lifetime .336. On the other hand, he still hit 39 home runs and drove in 108, each of which was either the clear leader or tied for the lead. And he's 33. But I am hearing that there are marital troubles for young Mr. Foxx. Also, since Babe Herman is no longer with the team, he's begun drinking a bit more than before. And with a seven year contract at $42,660 per, he can afford a lot of drinks - much more than he can afford a divorce.

    None of the three remaining Original Orioles have retired, though Jake Farenchick has been released by the Indians. O. J. Harty is still with the Yanks, and Josh Kress is still with the Cubs.

    As usual, a lot of men are let go by their clubs. Former Orioles Dixie Walker, Johnny Tyler, and Tommy Thomas among them. The Phillies released both Zeke Bonura and Dolph Camilli, who had been in their minor league organizations. Quite a few of the men released are colored men who may not have seen much action this year. Some of them look like they still belong in the minors, but they're worth a glance, and I know Andy Snyder feels the same way. I especially like the looks of Buddy Griffey, who was 9 - 3 in the Brooklyn organization this year. Right fielder Lorenzo Davis (73/90), only 19, looks pretty sharp too, as do pitchers LeRoy Ferrell, Ben Adams, and left handed reliever Proctor Phillips.

    The best pitcher on the market is Mel Harder, formerly of Cleveland. Yes, he was only 11 - 11 this year, but he's 31 and three years removed from a 17 win season, five years gone from 20. He's also in talks already to go to Philadelphia, because they need more pitching?

    Anyway, I decide not to pursue anyone actively on the first day. We'll see how it turns out.

    * * *

    Well, it turns out I didn't miss out on anyone I was hoping to get. Not after the first day.

    Jake Farenchick is going back to New York, but not with the Giants this time. He'll play for Ruth in the Bronx instead, and for $12,000, which is pretty impressive for 4 - 10, 5.16 this past year. But as I said with Harder, Farenchick was 20 - 8, 3.21 with the Indians in '39 - though that's widely seen as a fluke, or one last gasp.

    The big signing is the Reds' Bill Phebus, who is going back to the team that originally drafted him. A pitcher who we have at 82/82, Phebus, 31, is a two time 20 game winner in Cincinnati, where that's pretty hard to come by. He'll be going to Philadelphia, to join the World Champs. And he'll get $28,300 for three years to do it.

    31 year old first baseman Terry Lyons, who's been with the Chicago Hawks since they were the St. Louis Browns, will now try a new team and a new league. He'll make $12,100 for the next five years to play in Pittsburgh.

    Over the next few days, the Senators continue to show that Griffith is, if nothing else, committed to signing the cheapest players he can. If that means he needs to hire former Negro Leaguers such as 28 year old second baseman Tommy Sampson, then so be it. The Cardinals have signed another colored second baseman in 22 year old Marshall Riddle, but he's more likely to start in the minors rather than making a double play combination with my nephew.

    The Bees are putting a game face on matters, snatching up 28 year old former Red shortstop Arky Vaughan (86/88), and 27 year old starter Hugh Mulcahy, each for over $10,000 per year. They also make major moves to fill their minor leagues. Their most expensive move though is to re-sign 26 year old starter John Gaddy, who is 64 - 63 over the past seven years. They get him for the "bargain" price of almost $17,000. Somebody needs to tell them that merely spending the money is not enough, you have to spend it well.

    I made some overtures, but find that there are plenty of young men who are willing to sign to come here, but not nearly for the price I have in mind. At least former Negro leaguer Gene Benson says that, while he'd love to play here, he doesn't see us moving 25 year old Stan Spence from his spot in center. Though I might consider moving him to right...

    * * *

    Still finding that I'm more welcome at work than I am at home. Simple reason, really, that's been going on for some time. At work, I'm expected to figure out what the best answers are, and what we should do. At home, I'm expected to listen to the answers I'm given and keep my wife happy by following as well as I can.

    Actually, I think Susanna is restless at home, and that's causing some of the friction. Plus, I can go to work and get my Cokes brought to me, with an occasional shoulder rub. That...just doesn't happen at home.

    So, I double my efforts. We see Knute Rockne, All American, with Ronald Reagan, Pat O’Brien, and Gale Page.



    Wonderful movie, very inspirational. I already hear radio comics using the "win one for the Gipper" speech in their jokes.

    And then, because she wants to, I go to The Great Dictator, with Charlie Chaplin.



    I don't really want to, but I'll yield as usual. I really don't want to see him, though. Hitler? No, Chaplin. And for all that, I guess I can say that it wasn't terrible. The parts I stayed awake through, anyway.

    * * *

    The Bees continue to pay a lot, getting one of the prime free agents in first baseman Hal Trosky (88/88) for over $16,000 for the next five years. That one's worth it, I think. On the other hand, they continue to overpay, grabbing 38 year old center fielder Kiddo Davis (77/77) for $19,300, and 38 year old right fielder Tobey Smart (78/78) for just over $12,000. I know Smart's a fan favorite in Boston, playing there from 1924 - 1936, but is he going to bring that many people to the Bee's Nest?

    Still, signings such as that one are not as surprising to me as the realization that the old man still has it. And I don't mean me.

    The almost 81 year old Commissioner Kimball has been making trips to Washington, as I reported during the Series. Nobody was quite sure why, though rumors abounded. He was going to work up another international baseball tour. He was going to get support for putting baseball in the next Olympics after the war is over. Our anti-trust exemption was in trouble.

    Turns out it was none of that. It may have been even bigger.

    Nothing has been announced about any policies, but it seems that most ballplayers who've dutifully signed up for the draft have been very late in getting their official status determination. I was asked about it by Cardinals' owner Sam Breadon at the Series, and told him that, come to think of it, I hadn't heard a draft status for anybody on my team. He said that that was what everybody else had been telling him. A curiosity, I thought, and then thought of it no more.

    Well, it seems that Kimball was in Washington to do something about it. And perhaps surprisingly, he did. Again, there was no official announcement, and we're not calling attention to it until it's all nice and legally binding. But it seems that the Kaiser has gotten baseball players quietly added to status 2-A – Deferred Due to National Interest. Because baseball is, as a morale builder par excellence, in the national interest. It won't apply to everyone, through some formula that nobody's talking about, but it'll apply to most.

    Wouldn't have thought the old boy had it in him. But I am impressed. And curious how he plans to explain it if we do go to war and people see our players not being drafted while their sons are.

    * * *

    And so we reach a bit of a milestone of my own, on the 29th. Sure, it's Susanna's birthday, and I take her to a nice dinner over at the Love Point hotel, on Kent Island. Yes, that's a car ride, to the Love Point Ferry, and then the ride over. And then we'll have to stay there over night. I may be moody, but I'm not stupid. Usually.

    The other milestone is all mine. Well, mine and the team's. October 29th, 1920 was the day the modern day Baltimore Orioles came into existence, with the ascension of Commissioner Kimball and his Ten Commandments. Which means that, for twenty years, I've been the general manager of the team.

    And yes, despite two years of finishing in last, four years in the second division, and enough critical losses to break anyone's heart, I'm pretty proud of what we've done here. Despite embezzlement, debauchery, schemes, violence, monumentally stupid decisions, drinking, marriage, birth, disease and death, we've done pretty well for ourselves over all.

    I'm 54 years old. The President's actuaries say I've got another ten or eleven years in me. My ulcer, kidney stones, and so forth disagree. But then again, I often disagree with the President.

    But let's see what comes next.
    Last edited by birdsin89; 11-14-2014 at 08:59 AM.
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  14. #1199
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    Charlie's War

    November, 1940

    Well, at least somebody was busy.

    The Cardinals have dipped into the Negro League talent pool, signing right fielder Lorenzo Davis and shortstop Byron Johnson. Both will probably start in the minors, but would work their way up quickly - though I don't know that Johnson will supplant Willie Weston any time soon. They also signed veteran pitcher Spud Chandler from the Athletics. Not sure which team that will help more, really.

    The Cubs have decided to clean some house, just a bit. On one day, they released outfielder Gene Hermanski, catcher Charlie Fox, infielders Gene Handley, Gene Corbett, and Bob Neighbors, and pitchers Mal Moss, Pete Naktenis, Steve Larkin, Bill Kalfass, Steve Rachunok, and Tex Shirley. Moss, the former Oriole and Senator, decided that he wasn't going to get any calls and retired at age 35. With a record of 113 - 106, he's probably right. But then, there's Spud Chandler.

    Connie Mack grabbed reliever Ernie Rudolph (83/87) for just over $9,000. The question is, which Ernie does he get for his money? The one with the lifetime 3.79 ERA, or the one whose ERA last year was 5.66?

    Walter Briggs in Detroit spent some money and grabbed Freddie Fitzsimmons. Andy tells me that our scouts still have the fat one at 80/80, even at age 39. I admit to some trepidation, simply because of the Tommy Thomas and Jake Farenchick experiences of former Oriole pitchers clobbering us at every opportunity. But then, there's Lefty Gomez and Tommy de la Cruz.

    So on the baseball front, life pretty much went on during the first week of the month. I sent a check to Purcell, because that's what I do.

    In the world outside the game? A bit more. On the fifth of the month, history. President Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated Republican challenger Wendell Wilkie. Wasn't even close, either - Wilkie got the votes of eight midwestern states, and the two who went for Landon against Roosevelt in '36, Maine and Vermont. I suppose that compared to that election, it's progress. This makes Roosevelt the United States' first third-term president, though admittedly, when one is running not so much against Wilkie as Hitler, one could expect this.

    Our own local elections were a bit more exciting. One old friend lost, and one relatively new one won. Walter Johnson, yes that Walter Johnson, was running for Congress in southern Maryland. He's the one who lost, though it was really close. My friend the prosecutor, states attorney Steven Beckett, won in his bid to become the mayor of Baltimore, which pleases me immensely. Have to admit I like the man - sure he's a politician in many ways, meaning he's no less corrupt than any of the others. But at least he's likely to be corrupt in my favor.

    Not so sure about our new City Councilman. His name is Max Broz, and he's the son of my accidental nemesis, Mark Broz. Yes, the Mark Broz who I seem to make a practice of insulting in public when I'm not half trying to. Well, instead of running for mayor as his father did, Broz Junior decided to aim lower and go for the Council. Or he decided to start small and build his power base the old fashioned way - by getting in with the Machine.

    Now, I don't think Baltimore is as bad as some other cities in their Machine politics. Certainly we have no Tammany Hall, or no Pendergrast organization like in Kansas City, or no Outfit like in Arkansas or Chicago. We have the Friends of Lonnie Adair, but they stay hidden so much that it's easy to forget they even exist. But there was a possible hint on election night that I might be mistaken in this. Apparently one of the campaign staff was making some kind of speech to the assembled Broz crowd, when the candidate's father grabbed the microphone and started talking. We're told he had imbibed way too much, which I think became clear when he began talk to about how glad he is that his boy got the help he needed to win, that he wished some of his own backers had been a bit stronger when he needed them. The talk got stranger and stranger, going into a long, rambling discourse on these mysterious backers who helped his son and abandoned him. Finally, security took the inebriated gentleman outside, shoved him into a shiny new Cadillac, and drove away. Nobody would have known about it from the coverage in the papers and on the radio. Which is to say, there was none, and I only heard about it because my neighbor Ben Mondell was picking up some extra cash by working security for the event. Broz certainly isn't talking about it, if anyone is even asking.

    I did get it confirmed, though. Remember my friend Dale Lockman is Broz' public relations man. Or was - after this, Lockman quit. Or gave up. "Yes, I was there, Charlie. Saw it all. It's funny. I'd have thought that, if he weren't utterly drunk and making stuff up, then this would be the kind of thing that a Machine-type backer would have not wanted to get aired in public," Dale told me over dinner.

    "I know. I'm guessing that whatever support these shadowy, mysterious, and almost certainly fictitious backers may have ever offered the senior Broz is pretty much gone."

    Small world, right? Or at least, small city, even as big as it's getting. I mean, Dale and Ben both being at this event, when neither is really a Max Broz supporter. Dale even said he'd seen somebody who looked a lot like Chris Cole there. I'll have to ask her about it.

    * * *

    Or, rather, I would have had to ask her about it. As it is, I'm not necessarily speaking much to Miss Cole now.

    Sure, she'd continued to be nice to me, bring me Cokes, and so forth. I thought it was odd, and was amused by it a great deal. I mean, I've had nice secretaries, and I've had an ice queen, but even Sharon Chapman on her worst day wasn't as cold and closed off as Christine Cole used to be. And then to have her switch, on a dime, like that? Never did figure it out.

    Well, now I have. I just don't believe it. I'm not going to go into the embarrassing details, because a gentleman wouldn't. But it turns out that she actually thought I was making a pass at her! And being friendly to her, and all that, was just convincing her more and more that I was open to something...extra...from her.

    I have played back the wire recordings in my mind for the past year, and I can't imagine what gave her that idea. Well, with the possible exception of me complaining at work about Susanna, but my goodness, if a man can't talk around his friends, what's the world coming to?

    Anyway, she made a...presentation...and I rejected it. Nicely, I hope, but firmly. My goodness, for any complaints I may have, I'm happily married! And I'm hardly Scott Wyatt about it.

    I think she was pretty embarrassed by the whole matter. I expect she was. I know I was. Yikes!

    I also went home and told Susanna about it. On the way to the movies.

    * * *

    The economics of the game are getting away from me again. The Phillies signed their former starting shortstop, Mickey Haslin, to back up Frankie Crosetti. For $14,500 per year.

    A couple of more Negro League signings, and one that I'm sorry I missed out on. First baseman Eldridge Mayweather, 31, is going to try his luck with Connie on the A's this year. And Detroit has signed 17 year old Connie Johnson, who looks to be just one of the best things to come into the league in years. I would probably have a better idea of just how good, but for the fact that, when Tony Concepcion left the team, he took a lot of his knowledge and experience with the Negro Leagues with him. Andy is good, and he'll work like the dickens to catch up, for it's going to take some time. So in the meantime, we miss out. Walt Briggs doesn't - and they've already got him pencilled into the rotation for 1941.

    We have the same rotation as last year. Sure, it was great for the first couple of months, darned good thereafter, and one bad play away from the world championship. But I can't shake the feeling that it was pretty lucky. A few things going wrong, a few injuries here or there, and I could see us collapsing like the Tacoma Narrows Bridge.



    Rough day out in Washington a few days ago, eh? I keep hearing that there are plans to replace the lovely ferry boats across the Chesapeake with a bridge. I hope whoever designs it is forced to watch that newsreel about a thousand times.
    Last edited by birdsin89; 05-17-2016 at 08:26 AM.
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

  15. #1200
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    Re: The Orange and Black(Sox)

    November, 1940

    The Blitz continues in England. And Coventry is hit hard.


    Coventry, November 15


    Coventry's city center, November 15

    From what I hear, Coventry has a lot in common with Baltimore. Industry, working class citizens. Minor jealousy problem with a larger, more cosmopolitan nearby city (though Baltimore the city is growing, Baltimoreans seem to still have this problem.) They tended to overcome theirs with beautiful, historical buildings, including their magnificent Cathedral. They don't have that any more. And I find myself growing one step closer to wanting our country to do something about this.

    * * *

    Couple of former Orioles get picked up. Reliever Steve Larkin, whose best years were spent with us, is signed by Larry MacPhail in Brooklyn. He's now a 29 year old relief pitcher who spent all but one game in the minors last year for the Cubs. If you can't make it on the Cubs, you've got problems.

    Dixie Walker is going to Detroit. I sent the outfielder to St. Louis last year to get a chance to do more than he would have here. He got into 45 games in the Mound City, batted .258, and hit one home run. But in the minors, he batted .460. So if he's clobbering pitching in AAA, and can't hit in the majors, where does he go? And the hard thing for me to remember, since it feels as though he's always been around, is that they man is only 30 years old.

    * * *

    The awards are announced.

    American League:

    "Cy Young": Al Veach, Orioles
    MVP: Jimmie Foxx, Red Sox
    Best Rookie: Mule Suttles, Senators

    Nice to have a current Oriole back in the Cy Young running, and Veach certainly deserved it. This was his second straight year with 22 wins, and this year he only lost 5. His ERA was 2.51, and he led the league in both wins and strikeouts pitched. As for Foxx, well, he's Foxx. I could write that he wins the MVP award on the first of April, and have a better than average chance of being right. The shocker is Mule Suttles as the best rookie. Sure, he batted .247, with 15 home runs and 80 driven in. Not bad at all, though my biased opinion would have given the award to Jack Kramer (11 - 5, 3.03). The thing about Suttles is that he isn't exactly a rookie. He's 40 years old! He's been playing in the Negro Leagues for years, but this is his first year in the majors. I wonder if perhaps there wasn't some lobbying behind the scenes to give the award to one of those men who are, because of our past mistakes, forced to have their "rookie" season so late in life. And if that's the case, well, that's the only reason I'd be okay with Kramer not getting the honors. Well, that and that it will make him cheaper come arbitration.

    National League:

    "Cy Young": Paul Derringer, Phillies
    MVP: Johnny Mize, Cardinals
    Best Rookie: Bill Holland, Giants

    And the same thing happens in the Senior Circuit. Holland went 13 - 7 in 24 starts for the Giants this year, with an ERA of 4.33. Solid, though not spectacular. But he's another rookie in name only, as he's 39 and has been pitching for years. Mize started slowly, but ended the year with an even .300 average, 34 home runs and 113 batted in. And is there any question that Derringer deserved his fifth Cy Young award? I talked about him during the season when he won his 300th, and during the World Series. But I'd like to mention that his previous Cy Young award seasons were 1938, 1936, and two unofficial ones in 1927 and 1926. So let's add that to a list of what makes this one of the best pitchers ever to play - he was pitching at or near this same level when he was 19, and his team wasn't all that great around him.

    Finally, the Sporting News has announced their Executive of the Year award winner. For the second year in a row it goes to Horace Stoneham of the Giants. Even though they won 97 games last year, they were expected to drop off with a couple of key player losses. Instead, they won 105, losing the pennant only to an insanely good Philadelphia team. No matter how little I trust Stoneham personally, I can't deny he knows what he's doing.

    And besides, there is no way the powers that be are going to give an award to annoyances such as Bill Veeck and myself. I mean, integrating the game? Even breaking ranks on collusion? I'm going to make a pitch to get the All-Star game for next year in Baltimore, but privately I'll give you odds that it'll be somewhere else.

    * * *

    Terrible news from Chicago, as Jackie Hayes has had to retire. And then some. The second baseman with a .295 lifetime batting average over the past ten years with the Hawks, Black Hawks and Browns, was actually leading the league in batting earlier this year, when the incident he suffered in the preseason caught up with him. That would be the incident wherein a cinder from the warning track was kicked up and flew into his eye. It didn't seem to bother him for a while, but apparently it got infected. By mid season, it was affecting his vision enough that his average plummetted, and he ended the year at only .265. But now it's much worse, and he's completely lost his sight in that eye. And people say that baseball isn't occasionally a dangerous game.

    * * *

    It's November, so it's time for another of those Baltimore United Charities balls that I'm starting to feel much more at home at. Which is kind of bothering me - it wasn't that long ago I felt totally out of place hob-nobbing with all those swells and dandies. Yet here I am, palling around with the Governor, and the new Mayor-elect, and Senators Radcliffe and Tydings. At least there's Daniel Howard and his lovely wife there to remind me of how it used to be. And of course, Andy Snyder is back, and very happy to be here. Sometimes, no matter how good he is at his job with the team, I see him here and think that this is really his element.

    The new city Councilman Max Broz is there. His father Mark is briefly present, but as soon as he looks as though he's going to talk to Max a couple of Max's assistants bundle Mark back into his Cadillac and send him on his way. Mark hasn't been seen out much since his unfortunate public incident earlier in the month. Max reveals that he's giving up all his day to day control of the various Broz companies to his younger brother "Mickey". I have about fifteen minutes of conversation with Max, and it takes me about three of those minutes to determine that the company will be better off with someone, anyone, else running it. Including the potted plant in the corner, which might be a close run for him in the intellectual candlepower department.

    I get to talk to Mayor Beckett plenty, because some of the political Old Guard aren't quite sure what to make of him yet. That's all right - it's probably good to keep them on their toes. So I'm chatting with the beefy but not quite overweight man with the slicked back hair and glasses, and he assures me he'll always have time to talk to me. "After all, you're mostly the reason I'm here. Well, you and George Durant," and we smile.

    Beckett also tells me that he's hearing rumblings from the Old Guard that they are planning to move the Mayoral and Council elections to an off year, so that it doesn't coincide with either the Presidential or Gubernatorial elections. Which would leave either 1941 or 1943. "And it'll be '41, you can bet on it," he tells me around puffs of his expensive cigarettes.

    "Why?"

    "Because that way they have a chance of getting me out after only one year. But I've got news for 'em, Charlie. It's not going to go that way."

    Oh, goody. Another political fight. Just what the city needs. Excuse me out, please.
    Last edited by birdsin89; 07-06-2014 at 12:57 PM.
    The Orange and Black(Sox) - The Complete Saga

    Part One - The First Ten Long Years: The Orange and Black(Sox)
    Part Two - Ten More Years! (Orange and) Black Times
    The Spin-off Mini-Series: An Orange and Black Shroud

    Part Three - How Long Can This Go On? Charlie's War

    The Spin-Off: Braves New World

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